Jan 13, 2006

"I Have A Dream.."

by Martin Luther King, Jr.

Delivered on the steps at the Lincoln Memorial
in Washington D.C. on August 28, 1963.

Five score years ago, a great American, in whose symbolic shadow we stand signed the Emancipation Proclamation. This momentous decree came as a great beacon light of hope to millions of Negro slaves who had been seared in the flames of withering injustice. It came as a joyous daybreak to end the long night of captivity. But one hundred years later, we must face the tragic fact that the Negro is still not free.

One hundred years later, the life of the Negro is still sadly crippled by the manacles of segregation and the chains of discrimination. One hundred years later, the Negro lives on a lonely island of poverty in the midst of a vast ocean of material prosperity. One hundred years later, the Negro is still languishing in the corners of American society and finds himself an exile in his own land.

So we have come here today to dramatize an appalling condition. In a sense we have come to our nation's capital to cash a check. When the architects of our republic wrote the magnificent words of the Constitution and the Declaration of Independence, they were signing a promissory note to which every American was to fall heir.

This note was a promise that all men would be guaranteed the inalienable rights of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. It is obvious today that America has defaulted on this promissory note insofar as her citizens of color are concerned. Instead of honoring this sacred obligation, America has given the Negro people a bad check which has come back marked "insufficient funds." But we refuse to believe that the bank of justice is bankrupt. We refuse to believe that there are insufficient funds in the great vaults of opportunity of this nation.

So we have come to cash this check -- a check that will give us upon demand the riches of freedom and the security of justice. We have also come to this hallowed spot to remind America of the fierce urgency of now. This is no time to engage in the luxury of cooling off or to take the tranquilizing drug of gradualism. Now is the time to rise from the dark and desolate valley of segregation to the sunlit path of racial justice. Now is the time to open the doors of opportunity to all of God's children. Now is the time to lift our nation from the quicksands of racial injustice to the solid rock of brotherhood.

It would be fatal for the nation to overlook the urgency of the moment and to underestimate the determination of the Negro. This sweltering summer of the Negro's legitimate discontent will not pass until there is an invigorating autumn of freedom and equality. Nineteen sixty-three is not an end, but a beginning. Those who hope that the Negro needed to blow off steam and will now be content will have a rude awakening if the nation returns to business as usual. There will be neither rest nor tranquility in America until the Negro is granted his citizenship rights.

The whirlwinds of revolt will continue to shake the foundations of our nation until the bright day of justice emerges. But there is something that I must say to my people who stand on the warm threshold which leads into the palace of justice. In the process of gaining our rightful place we must not be guilty of wrongful deeds. Let us not seek to satisfy our thirst for freedom by drinking from the cup of bitterness and hatred.

We must forever conduct our struggle on the high plane of dignity and discipline. we must not allow our creative protest to degenerate into physical violence. Again and again we must rise to the majestic heights of meeting physical force with soul force.

The marvelous new militancy which has engulfed the Negro community must not lead us to distrust of all white people, for many of our white brothers, as evidenced by their presence here today, have come to realize that their destiny is tied up with our destiny and their freedom is inextricably bound to our freedom.

We cannot walk alone. And as we walk, we must make the pledge that we shall march ahead. We cannot turn back. There are those who are asking the devotees of civil rights, "When will you be satisfied?" we can never be satisfied as long as our bodies, heavy with the fatigue of travel, cannot gain lodging in the motels of the highways and the hotels of the cities. We cannot be satisfied as long as the Negro's basic mobility is from a smaller ghetto to a larger one. We can never be satisfied as long as a Negro in Mississippi cannot vote and a Negro in New York believes he has nothing for which to vote. No, no, we are not satisfied, and we will not be satisfied until justice rolls down like waters and righteousness like a mighty stream.

I am not unmindful that some of you have come here out of great trials and tribulations. Some of you have come fresh from narrow cells. Some of you have come from areas where your quest for freedom left you battered by the storms of persecution and staggered by the winds of police brutality. You have been the veterans of creative suffering. Continue to work with the faith that unearned suffering is redemptive.

Go back to Mississippi, go back to Alabama, go back to Georgia, go back to Louisiana, go back to the slums and ghettos of our northern cities, knowing that somehow this situation can and will be changed. Let us not wallow in the valley of despair. I say to you today, my friends, that in spite of the difficulties and frustrations of the moment, I still have a dream. It is a dream deeply rooted in the American dream.

I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed: "We hold these truths to be self-evident: that all men are created equal." I have a dream that one day on the red hills of Georgia the sons of former slaves and the sons of former slaveowners will be able to sit down together at a table of brotherhood. I have a dream that one day even the state of Mississippi, a desert state, sweltering with the heat of injustice and oppression, will be transformed into an oasis of freedom and justice. I have a dream that my four children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character. I have a dream today.

I have a dream that one day the state of Alabama, whose governor's lips are presently dripping with the words of interposition and nullification, will be transformed into a situation where little black boys and black girls will be able to join hands with little white boys and white girls and walk together as sisters and brothers. I have a dream today. I have a dream that one day every valley shall be exalted, every hill and mountain shall be made low, the rough places will be made plain, and the crooked places will be made straight, and the glory of the Lord shall be revealed, and all flesh shall see it together. This is our hope. This is the faith with which I return to the South. With this faith we will be able to hew out of the mountain of despair a stone of hope. With this faith we will be able to transform the jangling discords of our nation into a beautiful symphony of brotherhood. With this faith we will be able to work together, to pray together, to struggle together, to go to jail together, to stand up for freedom together, knowing that we will be free one day.

This will be the day when all of God's children will be able to sing with a new meaning, "My country, 'tis of thee, sweet land of liberty, of thee I sing. Land where my fathers died, land of the pilgrim's pride, from every mountainside, let freedom ring." And if America is to be a great nation, this must become true. So let freedom ring from the prodigious hilltops of New Hampshire. Let freedom ring from the mighty mountains of New York. Let freedom ring from the heightening Alleghenies of Pennsylvania! Let freedom ring from the snowcapped Rockies of Colorado! Let freedom ring from the curvaceous peaks of California! But not only that; let freedom ring from Stone Mountain of Georgia! Let freedom ring from Lookout Mountain of Tennessee! Let freedom ring from every hill and every molehill of Mississippi. From every mountainside, let freedom ring.

When we let freedom ring, when we let it ring from every village and every hamlet, from every state and every city, we will be able to speed up that day when all of God's children, black men and white men, Jews and Gentiles, Protestants and Catholics, will be able to join hands and sing in the words of the old Negro spiritual, "Free at last! free at last! thank God Almighty, we are free at last!"

25 Comments:

Blogger Special Prosecutor Biloxi said...

Fitz,

Thanks for sharing MLK speech! It is a important day for all of us to remember especially his words from the speech. I wish other people will remember the holiday and what he stood for.

4:49 PM  
Blogger Patrick J. Fitzgerald said...

Jackie has the same kind of heart and passion :)

4:54 PM  
Blogger Special Prosecutor Biloxi said...

Yes, she does....

4:58 PM  
Blogger Jackie said...

Fitz you are my special gift. Yes I remember Doctor's Kings dream so well. My heart hurt with a love no man would ever know. His words were spoken not from a piece of paper but from God. I listen. So much as happen I wondered if I would live to see the dream forfilled I did. I have met Fitz and all of my friends on this web site so yes I did live Doctor Kings dream. Oh and of course my children are my gifts too. I hope lonely that all of you can see there is love on earth with all people see the world thru my eyes and heart then you'll smile.

5:08 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Jackie, you are a gem. Did the grand jury meet today?

5:47 PM  
Blogger KylesMom said...

I teach 8th graders. Yesterday was the end of the semester and I am grateful for today's Teacher Work Day. I am even more grateful for the 3 students who stopped by on their day off to help me get organized for next semester. After my students left a support staff employee remarked about the character of the three. He said, "There are a lot of smart students attending this school, but unlike the students who just left, some choose not to use their intelligence.”

"I have a dream that my four children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character," has always been the part of Dr. King's speech I cherish the most. My hope is one day we all will not be judged by our skin color, our religion, bank account, or body shape.

Fellow bloggers, there are young people out there ready to pick up the torch and run with it. Seek them out. Encourage, mentor them. Introduce them to the Paul Wellstone Action organization.

On a final note, this Friday the 13th was a day to count my blessings. Before my friend left he told me how special my son, Kyle, is. Not only did he say, Kyle is smart and informed, but he is a truly good person. Yes, I am truly blessed.

Thank you PJF, Jackie, SP Biloxi, Grandmanuk, Esyle and the other PJF bloggers for providing a place for me to renew my faith in the American people.

7:10 PM  
Blogger GrandmaNuk said...

My father was a safety engineer that played a part in the "Manhattan Project". He often spoke of those he worked with. When he brought us to his workplace, often those he spoke of were African Americans. We never knews. My sister, of whom I am very proud, marched with Dr. King. We were very blessed to have grown up in the 40's and 50's not knowing what discrimation was and is. I had great parents who seemed to have been light years ahead of their time. And thanks, Klysemom, for including me in such a great group of people.

7:18 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Free at last?

The NSA's domestic surveillance activities that began in early 2001 reached a boiling point shortly after 9/11, when senior administration officials and top intelligence officials asked the NSA to share that data with other intelligence officials who worked for the FBI and the CIA to hunt down terrorists that might be in the United States. However the NSA, on advice from its lawyers, destroyed the records, fearing the agency could be subjected to lawsuits by American citizens identified in the agency's raw intelligence reports.

The declassified report says that the "Director of the National Security Agency is obligated by law to keep Congress fully and currently formed of intelligence activities." But that didn't happen. When news of the NSA's clandestine domestic spying operation, which President Bush said he had authorized in 2002, was uncovered last month by the New York Times, Democratic and Republican members of Congress appeared outraged, claiming that they were never informed of the covert surveillance operation. It's unclear whether the executive order signed by Bush removes the NSA Director from his duty to brief members of Congress about the agency's intelligence gathering programs.

Eavesdropping on Americans required intelligence officials to obtain a surveillance warrant from a special court and show probable cause that the person they wanted to monitor was communicating with suspected terrorists overseas. But Bush said that the process for obtaining such warrants under the 1978 Federal Intelligence Surveillance Act was, at times, "cumbersome."

In a December 22, letter to the Senate Select Committee on Intelligence, Assistant Attorney General William E. Moschella wrote that the "President determined it was necessary following September 11 to create an early warning detection system. FISA could not have provided the speed and agility required for the early warning detection system."

However, what remains murky about that line of reasoning is that after 9/11, former Attorney General John Ashcroft undertook a full-fledged lobbying campaign to loosen the rules and the laws governing FISA to make it easier for the intelligence community to obtain warrants for wiretaps to spy on Americans who might have ties to terrorists. Since the legislative change, more than 4,000 surveillance warrants have been approved by the FISA court, leading many to wonder why Bush selectively chose to bypass the court for what he said were a select number of individuals.

More than a dozen legal scholars dispute Moschella's legal analysis, saying in a letter just sent to Congress that the White House failed to identify "any plausible legal authority for such surveillance."

"The program appears on its face to violate existing law," wrote the scholars of constitutional law, some of whom worked in various senior capacities in Republican and Democratic administrations, in an extraordinary letter to Congress that laid out, point by point, why the president is unauthorized to permit the NSA to spy on Americans and how he broke the law by approving it.

7:34 PM  
Blogger GrandmaNuk said...

We argue about lawyers in public service, but there is something to be said about very visible public servants having some recognition of the law. Unfortunately, the current president's intimate knowledge of law does not appear to be of the Constitutional type. If you don't know, and don't appear to want to know, ANYTHING that appears on your radar screen that you like, is a GO!

7:45 PM  
Blogger bluewild said...

That is one of the most important and inspired speeches ever written. It is alive always. It still makes me weep.

And his work is alive always.

7:53 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Meanwhile, from K Street Reaction to Abramoff (http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/discussion/2006/01/04/DI2006010401411.html?nav=rss_nation/special)

Jeffrey H. Birnbaum
Washington Post Staff Writer
Thursday, January 5, 2006; 1:00 PM

K Street Confidential columnist Jeffrey H. Birnbaum was online at 1 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 5 to discuss the growing corruption scandal centered around former lobbyist Jack Abramoff and what repercussions this may have on the relationship between the lobbying industry and Congress.

An entry:

Annapolis, Md.: Re: Woodbridge's comment, "From Howard Baker in '73 to Alice Fisher in '05, Republicans have been much more willing than Democrats to hold their own leaders to a higher ethical standard." Does this mean we can expect Bush/Cheney impeachment proceedings to begin any day now? Just hoping...

Jeffrey H. Birnbaum: No impeachment. Didn't work out so well the last time, both sides agree.


Well, well, so "both sides agree"?

8:39 PM  
Blogger Jackie said...

I'm humble and honored by your kind words. We are in troubled times and current criminal events, but take time on Monday to think about the good things and people. Evil will always be waiting in th wings but just smile and know that there are more of us good then of those that are bad. Smile for me on Monday. To all my friends on the blog and the little angel too.

8:43 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Hey Fitz, make sure Ney and the rest gets nailed....I heard Ney is considering resigning now..

Ney being forced to resign...

Let the indictments rain down on every zionist neocon in the whole freaking affair.

-indy

10:20 PM  
Blogger Valerie said...

amen that, brother.

amen that.

10:30 PM  
Blogger calamityjane said...

Thank you for the post about Dr. King. His death was truly "one more in the name of love". I was a little girl in Memphis when he was murdeed and I'll never forget how sad my family was. We were a minority at the time in the sense that we were poor white people who followed the Golden Rule without regard to superficial things like race.

10:45 PM  
Anonymous eslye said...

kylesmom
thank you for the beautiful thoughts

I was there and very active in the movements of the sixties..
Tis a sad fact but many of our leaders today..
have traded their white KKK Robes for pin Stripe Suits....
it is simply beyond me that men and women take oaths to serve the people and then consider themselves above them...
Poem I wrote that i raised my children By:
Giving
God gives me the perfume of His Trees
He gives me the buzzing of little bees
He gives me the sun and the rain
And His message to me is very plain
To give but what I can
When I grow to be a man
I cannot give the perfume of one tree
I cannot give the buzz of one small bee
But the greatest gift I can give
is me

10:49 PM  
Blogger KylesMom said...

My dad was career army (and my mom did wear combat boots). I grew up on army bases from Ft. Richardson, Alaska to Ft. Leonard Wood, Missouri. My world was full of people of any and every combination you can imagine. One spring evening we had tickets to see the Harlem Globetrotters at Ft. Wood. The day before the game, Dr. King was assassinated in Memphis. The Globetrotters announced they would be performing that night in memory of Dr. King. My parents debated whether to let us attend. They wondered if their white, blue-eyed kids would be safe. We went. We were safe. And it was a great tribute to Dr. King that Whites, Blacks, Asians – everyone - could be in one place and appreciate our differences, not be threatened by them.

Grandmanuk, how privileged we are to have parents who raised us to be tolerant and to respect everyone.
I only wish our government showed half as much respect for our Veterans. What the government promised my parents for their lifetime of service is not what they have. My heart aches for the way our government has and is treating our Veterans.

11:02 PM  
Anonymous eslye said...

I have been in the trenches..

My hubby is one of those Veterans ..
They are smearing Murtha now...
when will it end..

11:09 PM  
Blogger KylesMom said...

eslye,

Thank you for sharing.

I've had students that ask me why people my age are so liberal. Funny, but I never thought of having respect for others on this Earth as being liberal. I'm so glad I grew up in the '60's and got to witness first hand a country trying to come to terms with its prejudices. The struggle continues . . .

11:22 PM  
Anonymous keepin' it real fo' shizzle said...

Five score years ago, a bootylicious American, in whose symbolic shadow we stand signed tha Emancipizzles Proclamizzle. This momentous decree came as a bootylicious beacon light of hope ta millions of Negro slaves who had bizzle seared in tha flames of witering injustice. It came as a joyous daybreak ta end tha long night of captivity yeah yeah baby. But one hundred years lata, we mizzle face tha tragic fact thiznat tha Negro is still not free . Keep'n it gangsta dogg.

One hundred years rappa tha life of tha Negro is still sadly crippled by tha manacles of segregizzles n tha chains of discriminizzles. One hundred years pusha tha Negro lives on a lonely island of poverty in tha midst of a V-to-tha-izzast ocean of material prosperity. One hundred years poser tha Negro is still languish'n in tha corna of American society n finds himself an exile in his own land so you betta run and grab yo glock.

So we have come here today ta dramatize an appall'n condition. In a sense we hizzle come ta our nation's capital ta ciznash a check . Boo-Yaa!. Wizzle tha architects of our republic wrote tha magnifizzles words of tha Constitizzles n tha Declarizzle of Independizzle they were sign'n a promissory note ta whiznich every American was ta fizzay hizzle like a tru playa'.

This note was a promise tizzy all men would be guaranteed tha inalienable rights of life, liberty, n tha pursuit of happiness . Freak y'all, into the beat y'all. It is obvious today tizzy America has defaulted on this promissory nizzle insofar as her citizens of color is concerned . Nigga get shut up or get wet up. Instead of honor'n this sacred obligation, America has given tha Negro thugz a bad check whizzay has come back marked "insuffizzles funds." But we refuse ta believe thizzay tha bank of justice is bankrupt. We refuse ta believe thizzay there is insufficient funds in tha bootylicious vaults of opportunity of this nation.

So we have come ta cizzash this chizzay -- a chizzay thizzay wizzy gizzy us upon demand tha riches of freedom n tha security of justice in tha mutha fuckin club. We have also come ta this hallowed S-P-to-tha-izzot ta remind America of tha fierce urgency of now cuz Im tha Double O G. This is no time ta engage in tha luxury of cool'n off or ta takes tha frontin' drizzug of gradualism. Now is tha tizzle ta rizzle from tha dizzark n desolate valley of segregizzles ta tha sunlit path of racial justice. Now is tha tizzle ta open tha doors of opportunity ta all of God's children . Hollaz to the East Side. Now is tha time ta lift our nation frizzom tha quicksands of racial injustice ta tha solid rizzay of brotherhood fo' sheezy.

It would be fatal fo` tha nation ta overlook tha urgency of tha moment n ta underestimate tha determinizzle of tha Negro. This swelter'n summa of tha Negro's legitimate discontent W-to-tha-izzill not pass until there is an hatin' autumn of freedom n equality. Nineteen sixty-three is not an end, but a frontin'. Those who hope tizzle tha Negro needed ta bliznow off steam n wizzle now be content wizzle have a rude messin' if tha nation returns ta business as usual. There wizzle be neitha riznest nor tranquility in America until tha Negro is granted his citizizzles rights . Nigga get shut up or get wet up.

The whirlwinds of revolt will continue ta shakes tha foundations of our nation until tha bright day of justice emerges so you betta run and grab yo glock. But there is sum-m sum-m that I mizzay say ta mah thugz who stand on tha wizzle threshold which leads into tha palace of justice. In tha process of steppin' our rightful place we M-to-tha-izzust not be guilty of wrongful deeds. Let us not seek ta satisfy our thirst fo` freedom by drink'n fizzle tha cup of bitterness n hatred.

We mizzay hustla conduct our struggle on tha high plane of dignity n discipline from tha streets of tha L-B-C. we miznust not allow our creative protest ta degenerate into physical violence. Again n again we must rise ta tha majestic heights of meet'n physical force wit soul force and yo momma.

The marvelous new militancy which has engulfed tha Negro community must not lead us ta distrust of all white people, fo` many of our white brotha, as evidenced by they presence here today, have come ta realize tizzle they destiny is tied up wit our destiny n they freedom is inextricably bound ta our freedom.

We cannot walk alone. And as we wizzay we must makes tha pledge that we S-H-to-tha-izzall mizzarch aheezee. We cannot tizzy biznack. There is those who is ask'n tha devotees of civil rights, "Whizzen W-to-tha-izzill you be satisfied?" we can neva be satisfied as long as our bodies, heavy wit tha fatigue of travel, cannot gain lodg'n in tha motels of tha highways n tha hotels of tha cities . Boo-Yaa!. We cannot be satisfied as long as tha Negro's basic mobility is from a smalla ghetto ta a motherfucka one. We can neva be satisfied as long as a Negro in Mississippi cannot vote n a Negro in New York believes he has nuttin' fo` whizzich ta vote ya feelin' me?. No, no, we is not satisfied, n we will not be satisfied until justice rolls dizzle like brotha n righteousness like a mighty stream . Boom bam as I step in the jam, God damn.

Iam not unmindful tizzle some of you have come hizzle out of bootylicious trials n tribulizzles n' shit. Some of you have come fresh from narrow cells like this and like that and like this and uh. Some of you hizzle come fizzy areas where yo quest fo` freedom left you battered by tha storms of persecizzles n staggered by tha winds of po-po brutality . Tru niggaz do niggaz. You hizzle been tha veterans of creative suffer'n. Continue ta wizzork wit tha faith tizzle unearned suffer'n is redemptive but real niggaz don't give a fuck.

Go biznack ta Mississizzle go B-to-tha-izzack ta Alabama, go bizzy ta Georgia, go back ta Louisiana, go back ta tha slums n ghettos of our northern cities, know'n tizzy somehow this situation can n wizzle be changed. Let us not wallow in tha valley of despair cuz I'm fresh out the pen. I say ta you today, mah friends, that in spite of tha difficizzles n frustrations of tha moment, I still have a dream , chill yo. It is a dream deeply rooted in tha American dream . Ya fuck with us, we gots to fuck you up.

Ihave a dream thizzay one day this nation wizzle rise up n live out tha true mean'n of its creed yaba daba dizzle: "We hold these truths ta be self-evizzles . Boo-Yaa!: that all men is created equal." I have a dream tizzle one day on tha red hills of Georgia tha sons of forma slaves n tha sons of hustla slaveowna will be able ta sit dizzy shot calla at a table of brotherhood. I hizzle a dream tizzle one day even tha state of Mississizzles a desert state, bustin' wit tha hizzy of injustice n oppression, will be transformed into an oasis of freedom n justice. I have a dream thiznat mah four children wizzy one day live in a nation where tizzle wizzill not be judged by tha color of they skin but by tha content of they nigga. I hizzle a dream today.

Ihizzle a dream tizzy one day tha state of Alabama, whose governor's lips is presently dripp'n wit tha words of interpizzles n nullificizzle wiznill be transformed into a situation where shawty black boys n black bitchez will be able ta join hands wit shawty white boys n white bitchez n walk brotha as brotha n brotha. I have a dream today if you gots a paper stack. I have a dream tizzle one day every valley shiznall be exalted, every hizzay n mountain S-H-to-tha-izzall be made low, tha rough places will be made plain, n tha crooked places will be made straight, n tha glory of tha Lord shall be revealed, n all flesh shall see it togetha cuz I put gangsta rap on tha map. This is our hope. This is tha faith wit W-H-to-tha-izzich I return ta tha South. Wit this faith we wizzill be able ta hew out of tha mountain of despair a stone of hope cuz I'm fresh out the pen. Wit this faith we W-to-tha-izzill be able ta transform tha jangl'n discords of our nation into a beautiful symphony of brotherhood . Boom bam as I step in the jam, God damn. Wit this faith we W-to-tha-izzill be able ta wizzle togetha, ta pizzle brotha ta struggle togetha, ta go ta jail poser ta stand up fo` freedom killa gang bangin' T-H-to-tha-izzat we wizzle be free one day.

This wizzle be tha day when all of God's children W-to-tha-izzill be able ta sing wit a new mean'n, "My country, 'tis of thee, sweet land of liberty, of thee I sing fo shizzle. Land where mah fatha died, land of tha pilgrim's pride, from every mountizzles let freedom pimpin' And if America is ta be a bootylicious nation, this mizzy become true now motherfuckers lemme here ya say hoe. So let freedom ring from tha prodigious hilltops of New Hampshire in tha dogg pound. Let freedom ring F-R-to-tha-izzom tha mighty mountains of New York. Let freedom ring frizzom tha heighten'n Alleghenies of Pennsylvania n shit! Let freedom ring fizzy tha snowcapped Rockies of Colorado! Let freedom ring from tha curvaceous peaks of California! But not only that; let freedom ring F-R-to-tha-izzom Stone Mountain of Georgia! Let freedom ring from Lookout Mountain of Tennessee! Let freedom ring friznom every hill n every molehill of Mississippi. Fizzy every mountizzles let freedom ring.

When we let freedom ring, whiznen we let it ring friznom every village n every hamlet, fizzle every state n every city, we will be able ta speed up tizzy day wizzy all of God's children, bliznack men n white men, Jews n Gentiles, Protestants n Catholics, W-to-tha-izzill be able ta join hands n sing in tha words of tha old Negro spiritual, "Free at last! free at last droppin hits! thank God Almighty, we is fizzle at last!"

5:13 PM  
Anonymous Anonymous said...

Fitz and Biloxi,

I appreciate you are arresting those fake Russian-Israeli front companies who are buying up everybody's cell phone records such as that recent one in Texas.

Can you please hurry it up now??? Look at what we got going on here...

"With the Iraq invasion, USIS obtained lucrative Pentagon private security contracts in Iraq. At a 2004 job fair in Falls Church, Virginia, USIS was advertising for "interrogators" and "protection specialists" for "overseas assignments." While he was in Iraq training Iraqi police and overseeing the USIS contract to train police as part of the Pentagon's Civilian Police Assistance Training Team, Westhusing received an anonymous letter that reported USIS's Private Services Division (PSD) was engaged in fraudulent activities in Iraq, including over-billing the government. In addition, the letter reported that USIS security personnel had murdered innocent Iraqis. After demanding answers from USIS, Westhusing reported the problems up the chain of command. After an "investigation," the Army found no evidence of wrongdoing by USIS."
Full report

Take down Rove and go after the rest, its time to rip it apart!

5:37 PM  
Blogger Special Prosecutor Biloxi said...

The domestic spying has now reached the University of California of Santa Cruz campus. A student organization is on the watch list. I wonder if my alma mater, UCLA, is on watch list?

http://www.truthout.org/docs_2006/011406H.shtml

8:21 PM  
Blogger bluewild said...

Special Prosecutor Biloxi,
I am sure that your alma mater and almost everyone outside of Orange County are on the watch list in CA. They are reading us as well you can be sure.

Hello SPYFOLK! Get a decent job!

10:01 PM  
Anonymous nexus said...

Some dreams become true, let this one become true!

4:30 AM  
Blogger Special Prosecutor Biloxi said...

Here is MLK letter from the Birmingham jail in 1963. Very moving...

http://www.politicalinternetservices.com/MLK_Birmingham.asp

2:28 PM  

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